COVID-19 Agriculture Resources

Below are resources that have been sent in the weekly Agriculture COVID Resources Emails.

Email sent April 20

Outagamie County Nutrition Program 

The will begin offering a weekly Grab N Go Meal and Shelf Stable Food Bag for “pick up” to Outagamie County residents 60 years and older in the Seymour and surrounding area beginning Wednesday, April 29th at 11:00 AM.  This temporary meal service is in response to COVID-19 and the need to ensure our older residents receive a meal with additional non-perishable food items.

Participants must place a meal order the Monday prior to the Wednesday pick up by calling the Seymour Meal Site 920-213-3490 and must complete the Congregate Participant Registration (link below) before picking up a Grab N Go Meal and/or Shelf Stable Food Bag.

Registration Link

Registered participants will receive a PASS to show weekly when they come to the City of Seymour Building entrance to pick up the meal and/or Shelf Stable Food Bag (which is optional) beginning Wednesday, April 29th at 11:00 AM.

The Nutrition Program will continue to deliver weekly frozen meals (7meals/participant/week) to those who are homebound and eligible for Home Delivered meal service. Frozen meals will continue throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and such homebound participants will again receive daily hot meals post COVID-19. If an Outagamie County resident 60 years and older is in need of Home Delivered meal service, please call the Outagamie County Aging & Disability Resource Center (ADRC) 920-832-5178 to make a referral. With the added Grab N Go Meal service, Frozen meal delivery will change to Wednesday 10:00 AM effective April 29th and no longer will be delivered on Monday at 10:00 AM.

Staff will be wearing protective face masks and gloves as they distribute meal bags and “social distancing” will be abided.

 

Social Distancing on Farms

The text below in blue are links to articles. Please click the links if you’d like to learn more!

Social Distancing for Farmers  Three action items on how farmers can incorporate social distancing into their farm operations.

I am having seed, feed, chemicals and other products delivered – what precautions should I take? Tips to minimize risk when have items delivered to the farm.  Staying healthy and taking delivery of seed, fertilizer and other farm inputs  This 11-minute video provides practical information to minimize contact and infection from COVID-19 virus for farmers and others handling agricultural input products

Managing visitors and deliveries to farms  Farms are the origin of the food industry. The health of farmers is instrumental at the start of a safe and secure food system. For this reason, farmers and those providing service to farms are identified as essential for Americans. UW-Madison Extension experts advise farms to consider all avenues of potential virus spread and develop protocols to reduce risk of disease.

Best management practices for providing a safe shopping environment at farmers markets. Farmers markets, like grocery stores, are considered an essential food resource. Each farmers market must decide if it can provide a shopping environment at least of equal safety to local grocery stores.  See more resources including for food cart and food truck business owners and community garden managers.

 

Planning to ensure farm continuation

Planning for a Labor Disruption This guide is meant to help you develop proper plans to deal with labor disruptions

What’s Your Staffing Plan if COVID-19 Hits Your Farm? Tips on how to build a plan should any of your employees, key team leaders, or you yourself fall ill.

Creating a Dairy Farm Operating Plan  A clear and easily available operating plan identifies people who are familiar with the farm to take over operations if you are unable to farm for a while and provides clarity on what needs to be done – template included.

Farm Continuation Planning in Response to COVID-19 Tips to develop a clear and easily available field, planting, and harvest plan for family, friends, and neighbors to use in case the farm’s manager is ill or unable to perform or direct field operations – template included.

 

Maintaining a safe workplace

COVID-19 Guidance for Farm Employers   Farms have unique challenges with the rapidly spreading COVID-19. UW-Madison Extension experts provide tips for farm employers about communicating COVID-19 protocol to employees.   IN SPANISH Información para empleadores agrícolas durante la pandemia de COVID-19 6-minute video COVID-19 Orientación para trabajadores agrícolas hispanos

What farm jobs/chores can I safely give kids who are home from school? Guidance for safe and age-appropriate jobs for your kids.

Get Your Workplace Ready for Pandemic Flu A workbook (set of factsheets), on workplace preparedness for flu pandemic by the Center for Disease Control

Preparedness, Response, Recovery Plan A series of action steps that an organization should take for a potential epidemic.

More on Safe Workplace on YouTub including “Fighting through the Fog of Stress”

 

Learn the facts about COVID-19

What exactly is COVID? Information and guidance from public health partners about COVID-19

As a farmer what are my risks of contracting COVID-19? Information about how the virus is transmitted and what farmers can do to minimize their risk.

Does working with dairy or beef cattle provide a natural resistance or immunity to COVID-19?  Information that clarifies why working with dairy or beef cattle does not provide immunity from COVID-19.

American Veterinary Medical Association   Information on COVID-19 and the impact on veterinary medicine and other supply chain effects.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS), and local health departments have compiled information for the general public to learn more about COVID-19.

  1. Individual protection from respiratory illness
  2. Businesses (CDCPublic Health Madison & Dane County)
  3. Travelers
  4. Pregnant Women and Children

As an individual, there are things you can do to help prevent the spread of illness.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough and sneeze.

 

COVID-19 Impacts on the Dairy Industry Video Series

A three-part video series covering:

  • highlighting perspectives on the COVID-19 pandemic
  •  impacts on the farm
  • and finding ways to regain a sense of control to put these stressful times into perspective

Access the videos at the following link: UW Extension Agriculture COVID-19 Response: Farm Finances

COVID 19 – Impacts on the Dairy Industry – An Overview
A conversation that highlights perspectives on the COVID-19 pandemic; impacts on the farm; and finding ways to regain some sense of control to put these stressful times into perspective. 8-minute video

COVID 19 – Impacts on the Dairy Industry #2 (Communication, Planning, Action)
Part #2 of a conversation on the COVID-19 pandemic and ideas for ag producers. Includes importance of transparent conversations with family, lenders, and other stakeholders. We also talk about how time spent PLANNING and PREPARING is a good tool

to reduce stress, and the clarity gained helps farmers to make better decisions during times of high stress. 10-minute video

COVID 19 Impacts on the Dairy Industry #3 (Markets, Recovery, Actions to Reduce Stress)
Part #3 of a conversation on the COVID-19 pandemic and ideas for farmers and ag producers. Includes observations on national and global markets, opinions on recovery, how consumer habits changed with respect to dairy product consumption in the COVID-19 crisis, and SPECIFIC ways to throttle back the normal stress response (eating, sleep, activity, routine and finding quiet time to reflect). 13-minute video

Speakers in the conversation are UW-Madison, Division of Extension Farm Management Specialists: Mark Stephenson, Director of Dairy Policy Analysis and Director of the UW Center for Dairy Profitability, UW-Madison. John Shutske, Agricultural Safety & Health Specialist and Director of UW Center for Agricultural Safety & Health, UW-Madison. Kevin Bernhardt, Farm Management Specialist, UW-Platteville, and affiliated with the Center for Dairy Profitability.

 

Resources from University of Wisconsin specialists:  Paul Mitchell, Kevin Bernhardt, Mark Stephenson, and John Shutske

Families First Coronavirus Recovery Act: Legal Obligations for Farms with Employees during COVID-19  This document provides information to farms with employees to help them understand this new law

Managing COVID-19 Instigated Risk on the Dairy Farm – Be Optimistic, But Plan  Many in the dairy industry may face tough conversations in the year ahead. This document breaks down the challenges by what risks may be faced today versus next week or the months ahead.

State of Dairy Markets In this April 1, 2020 article, Mark Stephenson, Director of Dairy Policy Analysis at UW-Madison discusses the current state of dairy markets, dumping of milk, how bad will it get, is there relief? and What can we do?

Six Possible Impacts of COVID 19 on Farms   University of Wisconsin-Madison Division of Extension – specific considerations that farmers, farming families, ag employers, and employees need to be aware of and plan for (March 16, 2020)

 

Safe Rates of Seed Placed Starter Fertilizer

Without fail every year after planting, questions start popping up about pop-up fertilizer. The questions always occur when there are emergence or germination issues. So before planting gets into full swing, let’s think about seed placed starter… Continue reading in the link below!

Safe Rates of Seed Placed Starter Fertilizer Link

 

Crop Update & Feeding Byproducts

Thursday, April 23, 2020 | 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm

Register by 4:30 pm, April 22 at https://go.wisc.edu/nlgp93

Over the last several weeks, the dairy industry has experienced increased turmoil.   We’ve heard about milk being dumped, grocery stores limiting milk purchases, dairy markets sliding, and processors asking farms for reduced milk production.  What is going on and what can we do?

The “Crop Update & Feeding Byproducts” webinar hosted by UW-Madison Extension, will be the second webinar in the “Farm Management Through a Crisis: Part of the Supporting Farmers During Challenging Times Series” and will discuss the current cropping situation in Eastern WI, a tool for utilizing milk as a feed source, and nutritional and sourcing issues related to feeding by-products.

April 23 Agenda:

  • Eastern WI Crop Update, Extension Agriculture Educators: Scott Reuss, Marinette County; Joe Zimbric, Dodge & Fond du Lac Counties; John Thompson, Winnebago County; and Kevin Jarek, Outagamie County
  • Utilizing Milk as Feed, Liz Binversie, Extension Brown County Agriculture Educator
  • Impact of Changing Byproduct Prices on Rations, Bernie Ford, Purina Animal Nutrition

 There is no charge for the webinar, and it is open to everyone who has an interest in this topic.

 Please register for this free webinar at: https://go.wisc.edu/nlgp93

Registration deadline is 4:30 pm on Wednesday, April, 22. Connection information will be emailed before 9:30 am on April 23.

Please direct any questions to Extension Agriculture Educators Steph Plaster at stephanie.plaster@wisc.edu or Amber O’Brien at amber.obrien@wisc.edu.

This program is sponsored by University of Wisconsin-Madison Division of Extension with special support from the following Extension Educators: Amber O’Brien, Calumet County; Scott Gunderson, Manitowoc County; Kevin Jarek & Sarah Grotjan, Outagamie County; Scott Reuss, Marinette County; Kimberly Schmidt, Shawano County; Aerica Bjurstrom, Kewaunee County; Liz Binversie, Brown County; Greg Blonde, Waupaca County; John Thompson, Winnebago County; Joe Zimbric, Fond du Lac & Dodge Counties; Tina Kohlman, Fond du Lac County; Mike Ballweg, Sheboygan County; and Steph Plaster, Ozaukee & Washington Counties.

 

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance for Farmers

*Note correction:

At first there was some indications that farmers would be eligible for the new, temporary unemployment program for self-employed. However, on Tuesday, April 21, the Wisconsin’s Department of Workforce Development updated their information and on the Pandemic Unemployment Assistnace FAQ page (link below), the last question addresses farmers. It very specifically says that farmers who are still working who are not affected by COVID-19, other than loss of profits are not eligible. 

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance FAQ Page
 
HOWEVER!! If a farmer gets sick from COVID-19 or they are caring for a family member who has contracted COVID-19 or meet any of the other scenarios listed on this link below, they may be eligible.
 
PUA Scenarios 

For more information on the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, please click on these links:
PUA Overview
PUA Scenarios
PUA FAQs

Usually self-employed people, freelancers, farmers, and contractors can’t get unemployment, but the CARES Act passed on March 27, 2020 creates a new, temporary Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program to help these independent workers through the rest of 2020.

Individuals eligible for unemployment benefits could also get an extra $600 a week added on to their regular state benefits through July 31, 2020. If you have been turned down for unemployment benefits in the past few weeks, it’s possible you may now qualify because of the recent updates in the CARES Act.

Peggy Olive, Extension Financial Capability Specialist has summarized the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program and how it may apply to farmers.

  • Farmers, along with self-employed/1099-filers, are specifically mentioned in the PUA overview created by DWD.
  • DWD posted a date – April 21st — that individuals can start filing for the expanded PUA benefits. More information about PUA applications and benefits can be found on DWD.
  • Here’s the sticky point – Farmers, as well as other small business owners, can either apply for an SBA loan OR they can apply for unemployment benefits, but they cannot apply for both.

People who could qualify for either program would need to crunch the numbers or work with their accountant to figure out which program/benefit best fits their situation. An article posted by NCSU, does a good job considering the breakeven financials that a small business might consider in making this decision, but cautions that the numbers they share are not definitive.

  • More resources:

UW Small Business Development Center has overviews of the SBA programs and can walk individuals through their options: https://wisconsinsbdc.org/services/covid-19/covid-19-faq/

Reach out to your accountant or existing lender for help in creating a business plan (businesses will need to compare the PPP to the PUA – see NCSU article).

Other Resources to help you decide what to do:

  • Access other resources posted on our COVID-19 website. Managing Your Personal Finances during COVID19.  You will find resources including frequently asked questions (and answers) about financial challenges as a result of COVID19 on topics of:
  • insurance
  • unemployment benefits
  • paying bills
  • sick leave
  • financial counseling options (free), including Extension Educators

Remember:  If you are having any troubles dealing with this pandemic, personally or professionally, please contact the Outagamie County Extension Office and we will find the help you need.  We are only a phone call away.  Please call 920-832-4763 and leave a message or emailmailto:uwextension@outagamie.organd someone will be sure to follow up with you.

 

Email sent April 14

Dairy Policy and Supply Chain Disruptions Webinar

Thursday, April 16 | 1:00 – 2:30 pm

Register by 4:30 pm, April 15 at https://go.wisc.edu/8f9044

Over the last several weeks, the dairy industry has experienced increased turmoil.   We’ve heard about milk being dumped, grocery stores limiting milk purchases, dairy markets sliding, and processors asking farms for reduced milk production.  What is going on and what can we do?

The “Dairy Policy & Supply Chain Disruptions” webinar hosted by UW-Madison Extension, will be the first webinar in the “Farm Management Through a Crisis: Part of the Supporting Farmers During Challenging Times Series” will discuss the current agriculture markets, supply chain disruptions, and stress management tools to get us through these tough times.

April 16 Agenda:

  • COVID-19 Impact on National Dairy Policy, Pete Kappelman, Senior Vice President, Member and Government Relations, Land O’Lakes Inc.
  • Taking Care of You: Stress Management, Renee Koenig, Extension Human Development & Relationships Educator
  • Market Supply Chain, Adam Brock, Director of Food Safety, Quality and Regulatory Compliance at Dairy Farmers of Wisconsin

There is no charge for the webinar, and it is open to everyone who has an interest in this topic.

Please register for this free webinar at: https://go.wisc.edu/8f9044

Registration deadline is 4:30 pm on Wednesday, April, 15. Connection information will be emailed before 9:30 am on April 16.

Please direct any questions to Extension Agriculture Educators Steph Plaster at stephanie.plaster@wisc.edu or Amber O’Brien at amber.obrien@wisc.edu.

This program is sponsored by University of Wisconsin-Madison Division of Extension with special support from the following Extension Educators: Amber O’Brien, Calumet County; Scott Gunderson, Manitowoc County; Kevin Jarek & Sarah Grotjan, Outagamie County; Scott Reuss, Marinette County; Kimberly Schmidt, Shawano County; Aerica Bjurstrom, Kewaunee County; Liz Binversie, Brown County; Greg Blonde, Waupaca County; John Thompson, Winnebago County; Joe Zimbric, Fond du Lac & Dodge Counties; Tina Kohlman, Fond du Lac County; Mike Ballweg, Sheboygan County; and Steph Plaster, Ozaukee & Washington Counties.

 

Crop Input Resources for Low Margins

During these times of lower profitability each management decision is also a financial opportunity that can help a farm achieve a profitability. The following University resources are designed to help you approach each crop production and marketing decision as an opportunity to be more efficient and with a financially beneficial mind set.

 

Crop Production Management

 

Videos include:

  1. Crop Budgets and Market Plans in Low-margin Years
  2. Corn: Survive and Thrive on Low Price Projections
  3. Soybean Inputs that Deliver Highest ROI in a Low-Margin Year
  4. Fundamental Soil Fertility Strategies for Success, in Corn, Soybeans, and Small Grains
  5. Disease Management in Low Margin Years – Field Crops
  6. Managing Insects Economically Using Conventional Hybrids and Thresholds
  7. Practical Weed Management for Low Margin Years
  8. Tillage Considerations to Reduce Operational Costs
  9. Precision Ag Technology in Low-Margin Years

 

Grain Management Considerations for Low-Margin Years

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0145/8808/4272/files/A4137.pdf

 

Economic Risk and Profitability of Seeding Rates for Field Crops

Optimal seeding rates for yield goals can help lower seeding cost and improve profits

Soybean Seeding Rate Recommendations

https://coolbean.info/2019/04/19/the-soybean-seeding-rate-conundrum/

 

Corn Seeding Rate Recommendations

http://corn.agronomy.wisc.edu/AA/pdfs/A135.pdf

http://corn.agronomy.wisc.edu/Management/pdfs/L003_HO_A.pdf

 

Forage Seeding Rate Recommendations

Seeding Rate of Different Alfalfa Seed Lots

 

Planting Equipment Calibration Resources

Properly calibrated planting equipment both ensures uniform seeding across all rows and ensures accurate seeding rates saving money by not using excess seed.

 Grain Drill Calibration

https://forages.osu.edu/video/drill-calibration?width=657px&height=460px&inline=true#colorbox-inline-239078345

Resources complied by UW-Madison Division of Extension Agriculture Agents: Nick Baker, Rock County, Mike Ballweg, Sheboygan County, Kevin Jarek, Outagamie County, Steve Okonek, Trempealeau County, and John Thompson, Winnebago County.

 

Hey Market Demand and Price Report for the Upper Midwest April 13, 2020

Data Compiled by Richard Halopka Senior Outreach Specialist Extension Clark County Crops & Soils Agent

All hay prices quoted are dollars per ton FOB point of origin for alfalfa hay unless otherwise noted.

The information presented in this report is compiled from public and private quality tested sales and reports in the Midwest.

The past several months of hay reports are archived and you may view previous hay reports, go tohttps://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/forage/ on the Team Forage web site and click on the past hay reports section.

Hay auction data is collected on the first and third week of the month and posted by or before Tuesday. Prices quoted in this report are for “as fed” alfalfa hay.

Demand and Sales Comments

Be safe. Hay prices are steady for top quality dairy hay and quality hay is in short supply. Overall the market has some weakness with an increased volume of lower quality hay available. Livestock markets are influencing the hay market. If you need forage or have forage to sell, connect to the Farmer-to-Farmer webpage athttps://farmertofarmer.extension.wisc.edu/. You may contact your local county agriculture educator if you need help placing an ad. There is no charge for the service.

Upper Midwest Hay Price Summary by Quality Grade

To read the full report visit https://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/forage/files/2020/04/04-13-20.pdf

Alternative Forages Videos

Farms across the state of Wisconsin and the Upper Midwest are facing forage shortages as a result of the disastrous growing season experienced in 2019. Farmers can manage their forage and feed situations by conducting a forage inventory. A forage inventory will reveal not only what is on hand, but more importantly help identify where any deficient supplies may exist. Knowledge of what your current forage inventories are now may help farmers avoid costly mistakes often associated with last minute decisions resulting from a lack of planning.

In addition, we know there will be a number of farms that once again need to plant alternative forages to supplement forage supplies or replace winter-killed alfalfa as well as discuss forage quality and performance in forages.

Below are the links for the links for the  Feed Inventory and Alternative Forages videos.

Forage Inventory: https://youtu.be/0xusEej5JnI

Connecting Forage Quality Dots to Performance: https://youtu.be/V6k6U8ACGr8

Cereal Grain Forages and Sorghum Forages: https://youtu.be/KnV7J7EbEoM

Alternative Forages for Dairies: https://youtu.be/syNX17Vzu30

 

Considerations for Landspreading Milk Webinar

The webinar is recorded on YouTube and can be accessed at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gk2aeVl4EoU&feature=youtu.be

Considerations when landspreading milk or manure/milk mixtures publication available at:

https://ipcm.wisc.edu/download/pubsNM/UW-LandspreadingMilkConsiderations2020.pdf

Additional information and resources will continue to be posted at:

https://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/dairy/

and

https://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/covid19/category/topics/farming/

 

More Information Regarding Payroll Protection Program

https://outagamie.extension.wisc.edu/files/2020/04/More-Information-Regarding-the-Paycheck-Protection-Program.pdf

 

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